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TMCNet:  Boys' fave toy GI Joe is still|firing 50 years on [Cape Times (South Africa)]

[February 11, 2014]

Boys' fave toy GI Joe is still|firing 50 years on [Cape Times (South Africa)]

(Cape Times (South Africa) Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) NEW YORK: GI Joe is turning 50.

The birthday of what's called the world's first action figure is being celebrated this month by collectors and the toy maker that introduced it just before the nation plunged into the quagmire that would become the Vietnam War - a storm it seems to have weathered pretty well.


Since Hasbro brought it to the world's attention at the annual toy fair in New York City in early 1964, GI Joe has undergone many changes, some the result of shifts in public sentiment for military-themed toys, others dictated by the marketplace.

Still, whether it's the original "movable fighting man" decked out in the uniforms of the four branches of the US military, or today's scaled-down products, GI Joe remains a popular brand.

"Joe stood for everything that was meant to be good: fighting evil, doing what's right for people," said Alan Hassenfeld, the 65-year-old former chief executive for Rhode Island-based Hasbro, whose father, Merrill, oversaw GI Joe's development in 1963.

But it's Don Levine, then the company's head of research and development, who is often referred to as the "father" of GI Joe for shepherding the toy through design and development. Levine and his team came up with an 30cm articulated figure with 21 moving parts, and since the company's employees included many military veterans, it was decided to outfit the toy in the uniforms of the Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force, with such accessories as guns, helmets and vehicles.

Levine, who served in the Army in Korea, said he got the idea for the moveable figure as a way to honour veterans. But he and his team knew the product wasn't in Hasbro's usual mould, and it took years of pitches before Merrill Hassenfeld gave it the company's full backing.

GI Joe hit the shelves in time for the 1964 Christmas shopping season and soon became a big seller at $4 apiece.

It remained popular until the late 1960s, as opposition to Vietnam intensified and parents shied away from military-related toys. Hasbro countered in 1970 by introducing "Adventure Team" GI Joes that played down the military connection. Into the 1970s, GI Joes featured "lifelike hair" and "kung-fu grip" and were outfitted with scuba gear to save the oceans and explorer's clothing for discovering mummies.

Hasbro discontinued production later that decade. In the early 1980s, Hasbro shrank Joe to 9cm, the same size as figures made popular by Star Wars. It has stuck to that size, with the occasional issue of larger special editions.

Over the decades, GI Joe has spawned comic books, cartoons and two movies.

Cape Times (c) 2014 Independent Newspapers (Pty) Limited. All rights strictly reserved. Provided by Syndigate.info, an Albawaba.com company

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